Coyote

Coyote-infor-opThe coyote’s best known trait is its yipping and howling, most often at dusk or night. Though coyotes have been observed to travel in large groups, they primarily hunt in pairs. Typical packs consist of six closely related adults, yearlings and young. Coyote packs are generally smaller than wolf packs and associations between individuals are less stable. Despite being extensively hunted, the coyote is one of the few medium-to-large-sized animals that has enlarged its range since human encroachment began.

 

Reproductive:  1 litter a year/Average 6 pups.

Food:  Small mammals, such as groundhogs, hares, rabbits, ground squirrels, mice and other rodents; birds; snakes; deer; large insects and other large invertebrates. Coyotes will consume large amounts of carrion and vegetation when available.

Distribution:  All Provinces and Territories of Canada except the northernmost portions of Canada. Unlike the wolf, the coyote’s range has expanded in the wake of human civilization, and coyotes readily reproduce in metropolitan areas.

Average life span:  4 to 8 years

Management Issues:  Coyotes are clever predators that often prey on livestock, poultry and pets. Attacks on humans are uncommon. Coydog hybrids are a more serious threat because they have the coyote’s predatory nature and the dog’s lack of timidity toward humans. Coyotes carry transmittable diseases and parasites.

Control of Problem Coyotes:  Coyotes may be hunted (but not trapped), without a licence, at all times of the year throughout the province(a. by a resident who has right of access to hunt on lands that are not public lands within the Green Area; b. by the owner or occupant of privately owned land, on the privately owned land; c. by a person maintaining livestock on public land, on that public land; or; d. on lands described in c) that are in the Green Area, by a resident who is authorized in writing by the person described in provided that these pelts must be salvaged.

Fur most prime:  Mid November to Early January

Average pelt price (2008/9):  $39.29 (18,965 pelts total)